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First Dessert of the Season: Pumpkin Crisp







I wake up during the night quite a bit, and after rolling around for 15 or so minutes trying to get back to sleep I usually give in, 
 reach to the bedside, pull my phone off the charger and begin catching up on the news, looking up information on lots of things I'm interested in, catch up on one or all of the several games of 'Words' my Dad and I have had ongoing for months and read emails. Or I look at food.   A few nights ago I wound up reading recipes and bookmarked 5 pumpkin recipes I hope to try this season.   I've now got one down, four to go and I hope the others live up to being as good as this one did!


 It's a keeper, winner,  gonna make it again soon - like this weekend soon (for my own birthday lol) and maybe for Thanksgiving too.  It's that good!  And, it's super easy.  It is a simple concoction of  creamy spiced pumpkin, butter crumb topping and crunchy pecans. 


  I found the recipe on Southern Living (by the way, you might check out the upcoming November issue…I think I'm going to be in it because they interviewed me this summer about turkey transfer ware), and their introduction to the recipe noted that one of the food staffers there ate half the pan.  Some of us at my house can relate to that.  I pulled this wonderful dessert out of the oven last night at around 9:00.  This morning when I got up it was more than half way devoured.  There's not much left now and it's still less than 24 hours after it was made. Five of my family members have tried it and each of us give it two thumbs up, even Trev who is the pumpkin fanatic in the family. 


Pumpkin Crisp

1 15 ounce can pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling)
1 cup evaporated milk
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon (I probably used a tad more than this)
*1/2 egg, optional.  When I made this I chose to add 1/2 an egg to the pumpkin mixture after reading reviews that mentioned the pumpkin was runny.  With the addition of the egg I did not have this problem and yet it was still very creamy and held together.  I will do this again when I make it, which I absolutely will.
1 box moist yellow cake mix
1 cup chopped pecans (I probably used 1 1/2 cups)
1 cup melted butter, unsalted
Whipped cream or vanilla ice cream (we think ice cream is better with it)
Sprinkle of nutmeg

Stir first 5 ingredients (6 if you opt to use the egg).  Pour into a lightly greased appx 13 x 9 baking dish.  Sprinkle cake mix evenly on top of pumpkin mixture, then sprinkle with pecans. Drizzle the butter as evenly as possible over the top.

Bake at 350 for an hour to one hour and five minutes.  Remove from oven and let it stand for 10 minutes before serving, if you can stand it.  We couldn't. We dove in. But, having now eaten it piping hot and at room temperature, I think I may like it at room temperature better because the crust on top cooled and became crisper.  Serve it with a ginormous dollup of whipped cream or a chunk of vanilla ice cream and garnish with a sprinkle of nutmeg, cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice.






                      Try it, I am pretty sure you will love it!





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Comments

  1. SL showcases some of the very best recipes, and that looks yummo! Looking forward to seeing your interview in next month's issue. Meanwhile, I hope you have a wonderful birthday, and an even better year to come, Nancy.
    Rita

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  2. Nancy, I will make this for my husband. He is the pumpkin fanatic here. I thought of you today when I dropped by a local consignment store. There is a set of green transfer ware for sale, 12 plates, a covered tureen, small platter, and two gravy boats. They have been there for a while so price has dropped twice already. I will send you photos in case you are interested.
    Happy Fall!

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  3. Oh, forgot to say, I'll be eager to see the article.

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  4. Hi Nancy,
    Wow that looks like the perfect fall dessert.
    Thanks for sharing this recipe make pumpkin crisp as I will have to make this sometime!
    Enjoy the fall weekend.
    Julie xo

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  5. Yum, awesome! Pumpkin isn't in enough food, I think it's underrated!

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  6. Hmmmm, delish I know! You make everything look so beautiful. Can't wait to see the SL article ~ my favorite magazine! Thanks so much for sharing ~

    xo
    Pat

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  7. Nancy, onekingslane.com is showing transferware today. They should have asked you to curate for them. I thought of the beauty of your collection in comparison and more reasonable prices too.

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  8. I made this recipe Sunday night and we all loved it. I prepared it exactly as you did and served it with vanilla ice cream. It was also good reheated a bit last night. I love your blog and would "love" to have some of your brown transfer ware dishes. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yay! I'm so glad you all liked it. I made it again over the weekend for two of my siblings and their kids and they all loved it as well! Thanks for letting me know you tried it and that it was a hit!

      Delete
  9. I just made this dessert this week! It was called Pumpkin Crunch Cake. I didn't know it was in SL. Now I know it is a good recipe. Mom said it tasted like a dessert they always serve at Cracker Barrel. Everyone loved this! Thanks for sharing this at Home Sweet Home!

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    Replies
    1. I've made it twice now, Sherry, and it's been a hit with both crowds! I'm kinda craving some now! lol Glad you liked it too!

      Delete
  10. wonderful looking. I'm taking your word on how good it is. We've sworn off sweets, but I'm breaking that vow to try this!

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  11. Mmmm...I think I will give this one a try! Looks and sounds delicious. Stoppin in from That Country Place,,,,have a wonderful day.

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  12. I have to say Nancy, love the pictures of the pumpkin dessert. My mouth is watering just looking at the images. I had never liked pumpkin until my boyfriend forced me to try his mothers pie at Thanksgiving. It was live changing. Now I look for ways to eat pumpkin during the year,, not just in the month of November.

    Debra Newman @ Unique Stone Concepts

    ReplyDelete

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