Saturday, April 10, 2010

Transferware Designs & Styles


  Time is running out to enter my $100 gift certificate GIVEAWAY  HERE.
Ends 4/11


 The first transferware designs of the late 18th and very early 19th centuries were copied from hand painted blue and white Chinese export porcelains depicting scenes and motifs of an Oriental nature, such as the Blue Willow pattern.   Transferware designs were later copied from manuscripts and prints.

Early Staffordshire Blue Willow Platter


Around 1820, as tastes changed, the subject matter on transfer ware was anglicized and began showing bucolic and pastoral English scenes of country life.  Cattle and sheep were popular themes as were castles and Abbey ruins.  Some depicted women in period clothing with parasols and suitors at their side in gardens or gazebos.  This is often referred to as Romantic style transferware.

circa 1825-30 Romantic Platter entitled Scroll


Spode Ruins



British Views & Historical scenes soon followed

Circa 182 Hicks & Meigh drainer Pattern, British Views



Around 1825, open botanical patterns were introduced by many factories such as this large, circa 1830 handled serving tray in light purple.





After the War of 1812, to further entice the American market, profit minded British potters began exporting transferware with scenes of American patriots and urban progress to the patriotic, eager buyers of America.

Washington at a tomb with scroll in hand by Enoch Wood



After 1828, technology allowed potters to produce two and three color transfer wares.  This Etruscan Festoon plate by Ridgway is an example which is very highly sought by collectors.  Yellow is the rarest color of transferware,  and the intricacy in transfer placement is unsurpassed.


W R Ridgway Etruscan Festoon Two Color Transfer Plate


Between 1830-40 flow blue was introduced by adding ammonia to the dye which caused the ink to run while in the kiln.

New Wharf pottery Platter


The Aesthetic Movement of the late 19th century (1870-1900), a backlash to formal Victorian times, influenced designs of Asian styled scenes with asymmetric, bold and geometric patterns.

Wedgwood Platter-Pattern Beatrice circa 1880-1890


I'll discuss each of these styles in further detail on other posts.  Some I've done already and links are provided above.

I hope you all have a great weekend...the weather here is gorgeous.
 
Education is an ornament in prosperity and a refuge in adversity.
Aristotle
 Linked up here...visit for lots of great fun, photos and articles:

Finding Fabulous
A Few of my Favorite Things
Show and Tell Friday at My Romantic Home
Feature Yourself Friday @ Fingerprints on the Fridge
Hodge Podge Friday @ It's a Hodgepodge Life


Thursday, April 8, 2010

Oven Fried Chicken Parmesan



Don't forget to enter my giveaway HERE for a $100 gift certificate!  Hurry....Ends Sunday 4/11



Oven Fried Chicken Parmesan
Prepare yourself for some comfy, drippin' with buttery goodness, down' home deliciousness!

8 boneless, skinless chicken breasts or 16-24 tenders (I used tenders here)

3/4 cup milk
2 eggs

I just eyeball this...I never measure it exactly
 3/4 cup flour
1 cup canned, grated parmesan cheese
1/2 - 1 tbsp paprika 

1 stick melted butter...sometimes 1 1/2...it depends on my need to quench my butter pangs...hehe
Directions:
Whisk milk and eggs in bowl.  Set aside.  Stir flour, parmesan and paprika in bowl.  Set aside
Dip chicken in milk mixture and then in flour mixture
Do it again
Place in baking dish one next to the other

Pour melted butter on top and bake at 300° for about an hour (don't worry about completely covering the chicken in butter)
I usually serve this with fresh green beans cooked and seasoned with bacon and a little onion, chicken noodles or mashed potatoes and a roll.  This is one of my favorite chicken dishes and is so easy to make!




Mix flour and parmesan

Add paprika & stir


Whisk milk and eggs with fork to blend





Dip, drop and roll...do it again



Place in baking dish and pour melted butter over...does not have to be completely covered










Linking to
Blessed with Grace forTempt My Tummy Tuesday
Designs by Gollum for Foodie Friday

House of Hepworth

Wednesday, April 7, 2010

Pining for Colorado

I am an Okie from Muskogee. Just like Merle Haggard says in the song.  I've lived in Oklahoma all my life, well almost.  Several years ago, Shawn and I talked it over with our children and we all decided to pack up and move to Colorado.  Shawn is a mountain boy at heart, having grown up in Idaho and I just loved the mountains.  We decided we wanted to give it a try lest we should grow old and regret never doing something we'd long talked about.  We wanted to experience the numerous outdoor activities and natural beauty Colorado offers.  And we did.  We spent weekends on long drives, visited National parks, hiking, exploring and with the long ski season we were at Breckenridge every weekend skiing and snowboarding our hearts out.   As I look back now, it seems as if it were a year long vacation, a dream, a very pleasant dream.  One I try to dream of often.

Today I'm sharing just a few photos from our year in Colorado.  So sadly many of our photos we had stored on one of our computers were lost when it crashed. We learned to back them up...the hard way.

We lived in the Southern part of Colorado Springs, nestled into the foothills of Cheyenne Mountain, part of the Rampart Range.  Norad lay within Cheyenne Mountain.  We had a huge deck that ran the length of the back of the house.  It looked down over the entire city.  The view below is a zoom shot of Garden of the Gods which was about 7 miles directly North of our back deck.  Garden of the Gods is known for its unique rock formations.

These were taken in the park at Garden of The Gods.  There are trails for hiking, walking and bike riding throughout the park.



The below photos is of four of my nieces, my son Trevor and my two girls (our youngest three) taken at the base of Pikes Peak.  
We went fishing here at Crystal Lake often.  Pikes Peak is one of Colorado's 54 14ers...the term given to those mountains with elevations of 14,000 feet or more.  
* Wikipedia says 53 14ers minus one or two.  Coloradans say 54.
  

Pikes Peak is the most visited mountain in the United States.  We were so fortunate to buy a pass and go there often.  Below is a view from atop the mountain.


When we first moved to Colorado it all seemed so strange, having left all of our family, all of our friends...we were alone.   The first few weeks we noticed to the West of us, higher in the mountain, a building of sorts which looked like a castle turret jetting up from the mountain.  At night, it stood gloriously lit against the darkness of the mountain for the whole city to see.  I wondered what it was and why it was so brightly lit.  We took a drive up through the zoo, yes you drive right through the zoo to go up here and found that it was a Memorial to Will Rogers.  I think most know who he is and if you're from Oklahoma...by golly you have to know who Will Rogers is...he never met a man he didn't like!  My piece of Oklahoma was  but several hundred feet away from my home.   I could walk out onto the deck, day or night and see it in all its glory standing tall.  It was, is, beautiful.


This view from the shrine is the same view we had from our deck, just a little different angle.  We were over to the right side, East just a bit.  The tailored grounds below are that of the Broadmoor hotel and golf course.  We drove by it several times a day taking our children to and from school.  You can see downtown further back into the photo.

I have to give credit to my sister for all these photos.  She's got a talent for photography and has enjoyed it for years.  We loved living above the city with mountain views directly West and North and the plains to the East.  The following pictures she took from our deck at night as we watched a magnificent lightning storm out on the Eastern plains.


 A night view from the deck, looking North East.





Dream Awake (by me)

I wish to sit a moment and take in the quiet still of the day
For too soon it will take its slumber and slowly drift away

Whilst still here I will reach for the day soon gone by
And as the light does begin to drift, so to shall I

Dream awake about a place of tranquil respite found
An abode within my mind I have created in abound

I close my eyes for moments and often want for more
To ponder myself upon the things I question of my lore

Somewhere there is harmony between life and ones dreams
One must pause to remember though time not ample it seems

So my mind still drifting as descending is the time
Wonder now, is time not itself to be considered as sublime?

© 2001 Nancy M Roberts




And of course, what would my post be without a piece of transferware?  I found this on Ebay after we'd moved back to Oklahoma.  I got it for Shawn.....ok I got it for me too.  We miss Colorado so.  I look out to the West often and imagine the Rockies are there.  I close my eyes.  I visualize.  I smile...and I cry.


Don't forget to enter my giveaway HERE for a $100 gift certificate!

Linking to Outdoor Wednesday hosted by A Southern Dreamer and

Notes from A Cottage Industry for Weekly Words to Live By

Dippity Road for Friday, Finding Beauty

 Blue Monday at Smiling Sally. Be sure to visit Sally for lots of fabulous blue posts!

Monday, April 5, 2010

Tea with my favorite transferware pattern and my 1st GIVEAWAY!!!!!

A new week, a new teascape and a new thing for me to do...host my FIRST EVER GIVEAWAY!!!
 How about I give away, hmmm. ummm, let me think, uh, well...let's just say $100 gift certificate to English Transferware, my Etsy shop?  Sound good?  Well check the details at bottom of the post because you can submit several entries...just follow the simple rules! 

This week I'm linking up with some of my favorite tea and table memes.  I'm featuring my very favorite transferware pattern.  It's by Spode and called Byron.  If any of you have read my first post I wrote about how I started collecting and then selling transferware.  As my collection was growing and I was on the lookout for pieces to trade up to, buy and sell I ran across a platter in this pattern.  It was one of those things where I knew I HAD TO HAVE IT.  It was on an Ebay auction and I was bound and determine to win...and I did!  I bought my first piece in this pattern from someone in Australia, and often I still buy from there.  It seems to be more readily available there and in England than other places I've found.  The first piece I purchased was this large serving platter:

I fell head over heels for the bucolic scenery in the platter.  It appears that the sale of a cow is taking place as women and the dog look on while a child plays at the feet of the buyer.
I was so excited when this arrived and I displayed it proudly in my kitchen, and still do.  I scour online marketplaces to find additional pieces in the pattern all the time.  Most every piece has a different scene, usually pastoral in nature, reflecting early English farm life.  The brown transfer is handpainted in various shades of blue, pink, taupe, rust, brown, green and gold.



Today I'm serving tea and my Coconut Cream Cheese frosted Lemon Cake using some of my Byron collection.



I used a single, lace trimmed gold window sheer slightly gathered atop my heavy marble chest.


I fanned vintage, embroidered napkins at one end and laid my Barenthal cake forks atop.  I just got this set of French Mabre flatware and I love it!  It normally sells at $125-165 for a 20 pc set for four. I got two sets for $125!  I bought two extra sets in this same Bordeaux color as well as Vert which is a marble green (about the color of my marble on the table).  If anyone wants these they're yours for $67.50 plus $12.49 shipping for a 20 piece service for four set.   Just send me a separate email if you'd like to purchase.   It's hand washable but that's fine with me.  I love the marble look of the handles and the ornate detailing this offers. 


  I've always loved this large figurine of a boy and his dogs and his attire seems to fit right in with that of the  people seen on the Byron pattern.  I placed him next to a fruit topiary I made a loooong time ago...boy do I need to dust that sucker!  Please don't blow this pic up and see how dusty it is!

I always have these tortoise shell amber lamps on this table.  They cast such a soft glow and add an almost candle like ambiance.  They are wrapped with an oil rubbed bronze finish and leaves that wind up and about the shade from the base.    I really like just about anything amber.

Here's one of my Spode Byron teapots.  To give a bit of height I placed it on a candle stand meant to hold a large pillar.


Creamer and Sugar on a handled tray.




Isn't this a sweet scene on the dessert plates depicting a young mother holding her infant child, their dog at foot and a modest cottage in the background? 


I added some candles...these are my favorite barley twisted candlesticks...I tied a shimmery gold organza ribbon with a beaded tassel around them.



As before mentioned, Byron is one of, if not, my all time favorite pattern.  There's nothing I dislike about it.  I'll be doing a large dinner table some time down the road but wanted to tell you a bit about J. C. Horsley.  Mr. Horsley is the artist who painted the scenes for the Byron pattern, which were engraved to copper plates and thus transferred to the pottery.  He was an English academic painter (1817-1903) and is very well known for having designed the first commercially produced Christmas card, commissioned by Sir Henry Cole of London in 1843.
Mr Horsley was also the designer of the Horsley envelope, a pre-paid envelop, the precursor to the stamp!
John Calcott Horsley 1817-1903


COCONUT CREAM CHEESE FROSTED LEMON CAKE
1 box lemon cake mix
1 small box instant vanilla pudding
1 C vegetable oil
4 eggs
1 C Mountain Dew

Frosting:
1 stick butter
2 1/2 cups coconut, flaked
1 8 oz. bar softened cream cheese
1/2 cup Mountain Dew
3 1/2-4 Cups powdered sugar

Mix cake ingredients well and pour into well greased and floured cake pans, bake 20-25 minutes at 350

For frosting, melt butter in saucepan over medium heat, add coconut and cook until it is slightly golden.  Remove from heat and add cream cheese.  Mix.  Add Moutain Dew. Mix.  Add powdered sugar and mix well.  Frost cake. This is yummy!  You can also substiute orange cake mix for lemon and orange juice for the Mountain Dew in both recipes for an orange flavor. 




MAY I HAVE A DRUM ROLL PLEASE?.........ANNOUNCING A
GIVEAWAY

WHO?  Me, Nancy
WHERE?  Nancy's Daily Dish 
WHAT?  A $100 gift certificate to English Transferware.
WHY?   Because I want to!
WHEN?  Winner will be announced Monday, April 12th 
HOW?  Read on my fellow followers, bloggers, Twitter pals, FB friends, etc. you know who you are.

Ok NOW for the giveaway rules.  Each of the following will count as one entry.  Do one or all five for more chances to win!


1)  Leave a comment on this post for one entry
2)  Blog about this contest...come back and leave another comment with your blogs permalink where you've bogged about the giveaway.
3) Tweet about the giveaway (you can follow me on Twitter too... I'm Transferware or click the link on my sidebar.  Come back and let me know you've tweeted this (please leave your twitter username)
4)  Visit my Etsy store and tell me by commenting on this post what you'd spend $100 on if you win. 
5) Become a follower and then leave a comment to let me know you have done so.  If you're already following leave a comment to let me know you're a follower.

The winner will be randomly selected by a numeral generator.  I use  http://randomizer.org/

 
Note:  Shipping cost is included anywhere in the Continental United States.  All bloggers in the universe are welcome to enter but keep in mind that a portion of your winning certificate will go towards shipping if you reside outside of the U.S.  I will pay 1/2 the shipping cost to anyone outside of the United States and the other 1/2 will come out of the gift certificate so the winner will NOT be out any money at all...unless of course you decide to spend an extra thousand, or five.  heehee.  Ok that probably wasn't funny to some of you.  sorry.
Let the entries begin!

A tea thought:
Gladstone (1865) Victorian British Prime Minister
If you are cold, tea will warm you; If you are too heated, it will cool you; If you are depressed, it will cheer you; If you are excited, it will calm you.



Bird Crafts Party

Colorado Lady for Vintage Thingies Thursday
Marty at A Stroll Through Life
Tablescape Thursday graciously hosted by Susan at Between Naps on the Porch
Hodge Podge Friday @ It's a Hodgepodge Life
Tea Time Tuesday at Lady Katherine's Tea Parlor
Diane at A Picture is Worth A Thousand Words for Second Time Around Tuesday
and Wednesday Tea For Me and Thee at Silken Purse 
Sachiko @ Tea Rose Home  
Wanda @ The Plumed Pen
Wanda at Silken Purse
Cielo at The House in the Roses 
Blessed With Grace
Show and Tell Friday at My Romantic Home
Feature Yourself Friday @ Fingerprints on the Fridge
Favorite Things Friday 
at The Hills are Livin
Tea Cup Tuesday at Artful Affirmations 
Finding Fabulous
A Few of my Favorite Things